Bulletin

Winning The Zombie War

Fear and greed are powerful motivators – some say the most powerful. In his book, World War Z, Max Brooks argues that fear is simply the other side of greed: the fear of missing out. Or, as our acronym-loving generation call it now: FOMO. Is Brooks right? Is our motivation always fear or the fear of missing out? Are these our most “primal” emotions? Often. Maybe even almost always. But always? Not necessarily. To illustrate, I’d like to talk about zombies. The corporate kind.

The Variant

In Disney’s newest show Loki, we are introduced to variants. Variants are people who deviate from their predetermined roles in the unfolding of history. When these so-called variants arise, they are promptly dispensed with by the Time Variance Authority (TVA). Loki is one such variant, and according to the TVA he’s a threat to the unfolding of the “sacred timeline.”

Investing in Hotel California

“You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave.” Hotel California, The Eagles

Last week it was reported that 45 people were killed while leaving a Jewish festival at Mount Meron. The annual religious festival attracts around 100,000 people. Its history dates to the Jewish resistance to Rome in the 1st century. Typical of the festival is dancing, singing, and bone fires. However, this year what began with joy and celebration quickly turned to tragedy. Although the massive crowds came a few at a time, most began leaving all at once.

The resulting crush – and the tragedy that accompanied it – was preventable. Inadequate facilities – specifically the size of the exits – were known to be a problem. But the pull of the festivities brought large numbers of people anyway. While incredibly tragic, the crush is a helpful illustration of what happens at the end of a stock market bubble. Irrational exuberance leads to the inevitable crush as everyone tries to leave the party at the same time. Today’s stock market is like investing in Hotel California. Checking out is easy – it’s leaving that’s difficult.

Beware the price you pay…or pay the price.

“The price you pay determines your future returns” is an old adage in financial literature. This is a simple way of saying that when you buy at high prices, your future returns are lower. Conversely, when you buy at low prices, your future returns are higher. Buy low, sell high. It all sounds right, but is it true? Or is this phrase just an antiquated relic of times past when money did not grow on government balance sheets, and asset prices didn’t always go up? That is a fair question, but it is not a simple one.

Press Release: #CorporateChristmasChallenge

https://abc30.com/business/fresno-business-donates-to-local-restaurant-challenges-others-to-do-the-same/8649486/ Corporate Christmas Challenge Companies Being Challenged to Donate Planned Christmas Party Funds to Local Restaurants FRESNO – December 9, 2020 – California’s most recent stay-at-home order is now imposing strict new limits on an array of businesses – including restaurants. As a result, Plan Financial found it necessary to cancel their corporate Christmas party […]

The Coronavirus: A danger to fragile people… and fragile economies, too.

Fragile economies are incredibly vulnerable to external shocks. When an economy has very little savings, massive amounts of debt, and asset price bubbles everywhere, it doesn’t take much to plunge into a recession. The Coronavirus, as it turns out, isn’t just especially dangerous to fragile people. It’s especially dangerous to our fragile economy as well.

Market Update: Safety Nets are Essential

“These are the times that try men’s souls.” Thomas Paine, The Crisis.
The Coronavirus is an unpredictable event that has disrupted supply chains, shut down economies, and created fear and panic in the markets. Any time there are sudden declines of this magnitude, we can expect prices to rebound in some fashion. This is often referred to as a “dead cat bounce”, which is perhaps not the best visual at times like these. But it’s meant to convey the idea that even things that are destined to end badly can have moments of optimism.